How to Fish a Centerpin Setup

Capt. Joe Diorio breaks down the basic terminal riggings of a centerpin setup, how to cast, and why it is effective for trout, salmon, steelhead, and other fish.

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When it comes to fishing in rivers and streams, it is hard to top the perfect drifts a centerpin setup offers anglers. Capt. Joe Diorio breaks down the basic terminal riggings of a centerpin setup, how to cast, and why it is effective for trout, salmon, steelhead, and any other fish that thrive in current.

What is centerpin fishing?

A centerpin looks like a large-diameter fly reel, but it has no drag, which allows it to spin freely on its axis (center pin) forward and backward. Centerpin reels do have a clicker, but it is used for transporting the reel, not for fishing. The advantage of centerpin fishing is that it creates the most natural presentation possible in moving water by allowing your bait a drag-free drift at the same speed as the river current.

What gear is used for centerpin fishing?

Often between 11 and 13 feet in length, centerpin rods allow the angler to keep as much line on the water as possible, to reduce drag on the rig, and maintain a perfect drift. The rods are also very limber in order to protect the light leaders.

Book a Trip with Capt. Diorio

Are you interested in fishing with Capt. Diorio? He offers guided centerpin trout outings on the Farmington River until May and then transitions to striped bass boat trips on Long Island Sound and Block Island. Visit his website to book a trip.

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Article: Centerpin Fishing Guide 

Video: Fishing for Huge Block Island Striped Bass

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Capt. Joe Diorio

Chris Megan

Filmed & Edited by Andrew Burke

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