Discover Gulf of Maine Pollock Fishing

pollock jig teaser fly

In the Gulf of Maine, late autumn and early winter are typically the hottest months for pollock action.

Nicknamed “Boston bluefish,” pollock are not truly groundfish, as they often school up well off the sea floor in pursuit of herring, mackerel, sand eels, squid and other forage species. During most winters, pollock feed with profound aggressiveness until sometime in late January, when acres of baitfish become harder to locate or travel to areas beyond reasonable target range. Until that time, however, rugged anglers who just can’t stay away can use good weather windows as an opportunity to tussle with bruiser pollock.

The number of boats sailing to places like Jeffreys Ledge and Platts Bank declines precipitously as the weather cools and the winds intensify. Further, only a select few captains venture to the 600- to 800-foot drop-offs in pursuit of white hake. As the season wanes, the action turns almost exclusively to pollock.

When weather conditions are right, center consoles can make the run out to the deep water areas off Stellwagen Bank and Jeffreys Ledge where pollock school in fall.
When weather conditions are right, center consoles can make the run out to the deep water areas off Stellwagen Bank and Jeffreys Ledge where pollock school in fall.

Bait rigs can be tucked away this time of year. Late-season pollock fishing in the Gulf of Maine is a jigging activity. My standard weapon of choice is the 16-ounce, un-plated Lav Jig. I am particularly fond of using swivels at both ends of the jig. I have not detected a difference in production whether using a chrome-plated or un-plated jig, but I have seen these jigs out-fish others that lack double swivels. I like to place a squid skirt over the treble hook and, while I have had great success with it, I have seen plenty of big pollock taken without it. Norwegian stainless jigs, Angerman Jigs, and Crippled Herring are also very popular and will work well.

an assortment of teaser flies
With an assortment of teaser flies ready to go, an angler can quickly switch to match the hot color of the day.

Teasers or flies are highly productive, will provoke lots of strikes and can at times out-fish a jig. There is a fairly notable contingency of seasoned anglers and captains, however, who are vehemently against the use of them. Pollock are powerful fish that fight hard and cannot be put in the same class as cod, hake, cusk and other species that are true groundfish. Pollock are far and away the most pelagic of the clan. When you hook up with a pair of 15-plus-pound fish, you run the risk of busting one or both off as they swim in opposite directions and aggressively shake their heads. Busting a fish off here or there is part of the activity, but the chance that it could be a trophy or at the very least a good candidate for the pool is enough to preclude teasers from some anglers’ boxes. I have caught droves of pollock (as well as cod and haddock) on teasers and adore the opportunity of catching a double, so I am an advocate of using them unless it is clear I am over a school of particularly big fish. I do understand the other side of the issue, though, as I have seen others fall victim to a big double hook-up and have even experienced it myself. Ultimately in my view, the upside outweighs the drawbacks.

Most commercially-made teasers are constructed from nylon. Nylon does not have a natural flow in the water, so I recommend seeking out bucktail teasers. Bucktail, in conjunction with a small amount of Flashabou, will at times provoke more strikes than nylon teasers. But finding commercially tied bucktail flies for groundfishing can be challenging, and it is easy to run through 4 to 6 of them in a full day of fishing. You can make teasers for a small fraction of the cost by purchasing bucktail, Flashabou, hooks, swivels, thread, a bobbin, head cement and a small fly-tying vise. I use a standard hobby vise and make a bunch at the same time while watching a football game on a rough weather day. When the teasers get chewed up, you only lose a couple cents worth of bucktail since you can re-tie the hook. You do not need to be a fly-tier to make these; in fact, fly fishermen would hardly call this fly-tying. Nonetheless, it is nice to catch fish on something you constructed.

30-pound-plus pollock
A 30-pound-plus pollock will provide a memorable battle and usually win the party-boat pool.

The actual techniques associated with jigging are rather elementary. Either cast out, crank up a few turns and sweep the rod tip up and down, or cast out and crank the jig through the schooled-up fish. There are a few finite details that can enhance productivity. Recognizing current and tide, for example, are very important. If the current is ripping from stern to bow, cast as far as possible toward the bow. This will allow you a minute or two of vertical jigging before the jig starts being swept astern. If I am not sure how the lines will tend, I wait about 30 seconds and allow everyone else to toss their lines out first. When casting, be sure to angle the jig so that you are not crossing lines. Tangles eat up time and result in fewer fish, so if your jig is being swept too fast, tie on a slightly heavier slab of metal. Maximizing vertical jigging means less time resetting and more time in the strike zone. Resetting is another key detail. Far too many anglers keep on jigging when their lines have been swept under the boat, far out in front of them or toward the bow or stern. Once you are slightly off the vertical plane, crank up quickly and do it again. If you allow the jig to drift too far away, you will have a difficult time tending bottom and you will invariably end up in a tangle with three or four other lines.

Pollock jigs
Pollock Pounders
Left to right: Williamson Abyss Speed Jig, Shimano Butterfly Flat-Side Jig, Sea Wolfe Norwegian Cod Jig, Point Jude Deep Force, Sting-O PBJ

Penn’s Baja Special 113HN and Daiwa’s Saltiga SA40 are highly capable of handling 14- to 20-ounce jigs. Spool the reel with 50- to 65-pound-test braided line and don’t skimp. It is fine to use some backing, but ensure you are not leaving much daylight on the spool. When currents are ripping and you’re fishing in 400-foot-plus depths, long casts in the opposite direction of the current are essential. If your spool is half-filled, you’ll be adding additional friction when casting and reducing distance. Use a uni-to-uni or an Albright knot to attach at least 20 feet of 50-pound-test monofilament as your leader. It’s important to have a lengthy leader because you’ll be banging up against all sorts of rocks and other obstructions that can slice through the thin diameter of braid. It also eliminates the need to tie on a new leader if the bottom gets a bit chewed up and warrants a re-tie.

There tends to be a bit more variety with rod selection, but in general a 7- to 8-foot graphite or glass blank with enough backbone to handle the hefty jigs and fish up to 40 pounds is necessary.

Once a fish is hooked, haul it up with the reel, not the rod. An angler who points the rod tip toward the water, keeps it as still as possible and cranks steadily loses far fewer fish than an angler who pumps the rod as though he was fighting a wahoo.

ollock is a suitable stand-in for most recipes
Although they don’t have the culinary reputation of cod and haddock, pollock is a suitable stand-in for most recipes.

While vessels tend to be conservative in determining whether or not to sail later in the season, expect to deal with at least moderate conditions with some cold sea spray. Even on nice late fall outings, proper attire is critical. Layering is unquestionably the appropriate way to dress. The outer layer, which is the most important, should be entirely waterproof. A commercial-style rain jacket and lined waterproof boots are appropriate. With sea spray hitting you and an on-board hose that rarely shuts off, you will likely get wet. Also of utmost importance is a pair of waterproof commercial fishing gloves, which make handling ice-cold fish more palatable while protecting your hands from dorsal fins and sharp gill rakers.

The air may be a bit brisk in October, November and December, and the seas a little choppy, but those thoughts quickly get erased when rods start bending and big pollock and hake are hauled aboard. As an added bonus, it’s relatively common to see whales, dolphins and large bluefin tuna during October and into November as they gorge before the onset of winter. Despite the nippy conditions, it’s a beautiful and often very rewarding time of year to be out on the Gulf of Maine.

9 on “Discover Gulf of Maine Pollock Fishing

  1. Charlie

    Where can you find boats that make trips during this time of year? I’m really interested in going out on one of these.

    1. Derrick Dunstable

      Eastman’s out of Seabrook/Hampton Beach, NH goes out late into the year (weather dependent), through December or even later I believe, or until interest wanes and they call it a season.

      Check out their website for more info: http://www.eastmansdocks.com/index.cfm

    2. andrew

      If you like the small charter boat OUPV class….check out adventureandcatch.com they go out until November

  2. Derrick Dunstable

    Great article, great information, I love Pollock fishing at the tail end of summer through fall, and have even bested two good size fish so far this season (a 28 and 32 pounder, respectively).

    Also, since this is one of my favorite fisheries, I thought I’d chime in with some pointers, feedback and tips of my own, based on both my own experience and experimentation:

    (1) Pollock can at times be very skittish, as I’ve seen a good chunk of fish on the fish finder scatter as soon as the jigs start to drop onto the school (this mostly happens with a good amount of people on a party boat, but nonetheless it’s worth being aware of). Lighter lines of braid and a mono top shot will help, but you may need to restart your drift several times as you might hook up immediately, and then nothing for 15 minutes. Just be aware of this, and adjust your position to relocate the fish again.

    (2) As a result of above, have several mono leader strength rigs ready for an outing. I have 80 lb, 100 lb and even 150 lb test rigs (swivel, dropper loop for teaser, and either another dropper loop or snap swivel for the jig) in my tackle box ready for every occasion, about 32″ long each. This way, if the fish are big and not finicky, you can go heavier for double tackle busting pollock. If they get picky, you can scale down. It’s worth having at least several of each size, and they are easy and cheap to make. FYI: I use Berkeley Big Game leader material, it’s tough and it ties very nicely for these types of rigs.

    (3) Try to avoid using too many colors on a rig, as this can get counter productive. With an unplated or plated jig, try and stick with one color teaser and jig skirt, as from experience this seems to make a difference. Too many colors on a rig can turn fish off a lot of the time.

    (4) With regard to teasers, I’ve had the best luck with blue, purple and pink cod flies. Blue was killer this year, and it seemed the ones that were wrapped with red thread out fished those that weren’t. Makes sense since using red resembles an injured bait fish.

    (5) If you think you’ve hooked a big fish or good sized doubles, remember to take it easy on the initial part of the fight (to avoid dropping fish or break offs). Pollock are brutes but will become easier to reel in once you have budged them off of the first 20-30′ feet of the bottom, where they begin to rapidly lose their wind.

    (6) It may seem obvious but it’s worth stating…when fishing over 200′ of water braid works very well for this type of fishing. Just make sure to use anywhere from 50′-100′ of mono leader (I always use an improved Albright knot, to tie braid to mono, and have never been disappointed with this knot) to absord the shock of a thrashing fish, which will greatly minimize fish coming off of the line. My preference is fishing 65-80 lb braid, connected to a 60 pound mono leader of about 100′, as this seems to be sweet spot for my outfits.

    Lastly, I feel the imperative need to mention that Pollock, in my humble opinion, has a very undeserved reputation among some seafood lovers as a cheap or inferior fish to cod and haddock, good only for chowder or a poor man’s fish & chips platter. But let me say this: caught fresh, I PREFER pollock over both haddock and cod, as it’s firm, delicious and great for an almost unlimited number of recipes. Filleted, staked, or cook whole, I’ve tried them all, and it’s as delicious a ground fish as they come. As a bonus, it’s one of the safest fish to consume (very low methyl mercury levels, safe for even kids and nursing mothers), and never has parasites as it doesn’t strictly eat of the ocean floor.

    It’s true that it doesn’t freeze as well as some of the other ground fish that I’ve mentioned, and I always considered this the one sole downside of Pollock…until I invest a small amount of money in a vacuum sealer, which made all the difference. My advice is that if you’re serious about putting some fillets away for the long winter ahead, that you invest in one of these; a good model is quite affordable, makes a huge difference in both the flavor and freezer longevity of frozen fish, and can be used for a multitude of other items designated for your freezer. It’s really worthwhile having one, and they don’t take up much counter space.

    My apologies to the author of this article if I went off the rails and essentially wrote a second article to his first, but I just had to share my passion and insight into this wonderful fishery, as I feel it’s one of the most under rated in New England.

    Tight lines everyone!

  3. Bryan Weber

    This article is spot on. Neil Feldman has been writing for at least a decade and he’s outstanding. I want to especially highlight his paragraph on finite details of the fishery:

    There are a few finite details that can enhance productivity. Recognizing current and tide, for example, are very important. If the current is ripping from stern to bow, cast as far as possible toward the bow. This will allow you a minute or two of vertical jigging before the jig starts being swept astern. If I am not sure how the lines will tend, I wait about 30 seconds and allow everyone else to toss their lines out first. When casting, be sure to angle the jig so that you are not crossing lines. Tangles eat up time and result in fewer fish, so if your jig is being swept too fast, tie on a slightly heavier slab of metal. Maximizing vertical jigging means less time resetting and more time in the strike zone. Resetting is another key detail. Far too many anglers keep on jigging when their lines have been swept under the boat, far out in front of them or toward the bow or stern. Once you are slightly off the vertical plane, crank up quickly and do it again. If you allow the jig to drift too far away, you will have a difficult time tending bottom and you will invariably end up in a tangle with three or four other lines.

    Very few anglers really pay attention to these things. They think pollock jigging is simply dropping it down and jigging off the bottom. I appreciate Neil taking time to highlight some small details that can really enhance the experience.

  4. Al Olhaus

    Came across this article a little late in the season but agreed–it’s spot on. Anyone can catch a few pollock but there’s always a few guys who toast the rest of the crew, and a lot of the details that are discussed in this article are what separate the boys from the men.

  5. Pollock-a-holic

    I grew up in Western NY, and have fished the Niagara for kings, so I have always looked forward to the Fall. I gotta tell you, the October marathon they have every year is infinitely more enjoyable than climbing into the Niagara gorge hoping for a steal head or king. Search on Youtube for Eastman’s Fishing. It’s beyond words.

  6. Mark Hamill

    I would like to purchase vacuum sealer target,in your store/company i would be happy if you can get back to me again with the prices and dimensions you having available in a moment,and also do you take all types of Credit Cards as your payment required?Kindly get back to me here or on phone so that we will work together as one panther. All the best and stay blessed.

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