The Striper Migration: When Will the Bass Return?

Each year is different, and the exact timing seems to be strongly influenced by water temperatures along the Atlantic coast.

Striper Migration 2018

Every winter, anticipation builds for the arrival of migrating striped bass. Each year is different, and exact timing seems to be strongly influenced by water temperatures along the Atlantic coast.

By tracking fishing reports from charter captains, contributors, and readers at OnTheWater.com, we have been mapping the striped bass spring migration from the Mid-Atlantic to Maine since 2015. Each year has been very different and provided some interesting insight into the timing of the striper migration.

In 2015, a historically snowy and cold winter kept water temperatures cool well into the spring, delaying the striped bass migration and resulting in later arrivals than most fishermen could recall in recent history. Yet, by mid-June, big striped bass were reported from the Jersey Shore to southern Maine.

In 2016, a strong El Nino blessed the East Coast with a mild winter, and the migration got off to an early start. Big bass appeared in Raritan Bay by mid-April, and fresh schoolie stripers arrived early to New England. However, by June, the maps for 2015 and 2016 looked almost identical.

In 2017, a mild winter turned cold in March, and cool waters appeared to delay the striper spawn in the Chesapeake and slow the start of the migration. Then, schoolies arrived in southern New England at the end of April. Then, in mid-May, a push of big bass surprised anglers when they showed up in Buzzards Bay and began moving into the Cape Cod Canal. More waves of post-spawn bass followed in June, eventually filling in from Connecticut to Maine.

When the ocean-run stripers arrive this season, do what they do: dodge the crowds on the jetties and head for the back bays and estuaries.
When the ocean-run stripers arrive this season, do what they do: dodge the crowds on the jetties and head for the back bays and estuaries. Learn more at Plugging For Back Bay Bass and Back Bay Kayak Trolling For Stripers

What will 2018 bring? We’re already excited to find out, and invite you to follow along as we track the Striper Migration. You can help by contributing to our weekly map updates—simply share your striper fishing reports and photos at OnTheWater.com or through social media.



Bass Migration Basics

Striped bass are anadromous—they live their adult lives in the ocean but migrate into brackish bays and freshwater rivers to spawn. On the East Coast, there are three major spawning grounds: the tributaries of Chesapeake Bay, upper Delaware Bay/Delaware River, and the Hudson River in New York.

East Coast striped bass three major spawning grounds
East Coast striped bass have three major spawning grounds: the tributaries of Chesapeake Bay, upper Delaware Bay/Delaware River, and the Hudson River in New York.

Smaller striped bass—schoolies—are the first to arrive along the coast in spring. This is because smaller, immature striped bass bypass the spawning grounds on their way north. Male striped bass reach sexual maturity at two or three years of age (at approximately 16 to 20 inches of length), and female striped bass mature at four to six years of age (at approximately 24 to 28 inches of length).

The timing of the arrival of larger striped bass, the 28-inch-plus spawning fish, depends on the timing of the spring spawn. Spawning takes place earliest in Chesapeake Bay, as striped bass move from their wintering grounds off North Carolina and Virginia into the Bay in mid-March. Spawning is slightly later in the Delaware River, taking place in early April, and a few weeks later in the Hudson River, typically mid- to late April.

Through tagging studies, scientists have found that individuals from different spawning stocks tend to exhibit different migration habits. The Chesapeake Bay spawning areas produce most coastal migratory striped bass (estimated 70-90%), and fish hatched in the Chesapeake Bay exhibit more extensive migrations. Those that hatch in the Hudson River generally do not migrate beyond Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to the north and Cape May, New Jersey, to the south.Every winter, anticipation builds for the arrival of migrating striped bass. Each year is different, and exact timing seems to be strongly influenced by water temperatures along the Atlantic coast.

20 thoughts on “The Striper Migration: When Will the Bass Return?

  1. JT

    waiting for them at cape may then meet them later in august at cape cod canal

  2. Roddy

    Can’t wait to send pics from Cape Cod Canal come the end of this month. I believe in cow.

  3. Jerry in Maine

    I’ll report as soon as I snag one out of the Saco river!

  4. Lloyd jacobsen

    This great. Keep up the good work. I will follow this from this point and on. Thank you.

  5. Don Pastor

    Does anyone know if this is showing fish for this year or – as listed – for 2017?

  6. Michael A Terilli

    It’s great information , Thank you On The Water @striperfishing @surffishing @fishingrhodeisland

  7. Fred Ballin

    In NewBrunswick, Canada, striper are messing with salmon and
    IMHO up there they should be harvested.

  8. Martin

    I’m hopin’ to see schoolies in Casco Bay in 2 weeks.

    Go OTW!

    Martin in Freeport

  9. Laura

    Great information. Getting my fly rods out and gear ready…anxiously waiting on Fairfield Beach! Will post when I see activity. Saw my first Osprey of the season cruising the beach yesterday…they’re coming!

    1. Carl

      Yeah mass 2 as they are every year in mid may.
      Ill keep the location as of done for the last six years.
      All i have to say if you find herring the schoolies arent far behing.

    1. Carl

      Yeah mass 2 as they are every year in mid may.
      Ill keep the location as of done for the last six years.
      All i have to say if you find herring the schoolies arent far behing. : )

  10. Emerson

    The big stripers are not in the Hudson River yet small
    Schoolies

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